1. It’s honest

Off-the-rails party girl Mickey meets sweet-natured dork Gus when she loses her purse and he pays for her coffee. So far, so predictable. But, like many Judd Apatow creations, what happens once the classic meet cute is over is far from standard-issue Hollywood schmaltz. The characters are smart and funny, but awkward and all over the place, too. You’ll cringe as well as coo as they bond and bicker through the tricky business of trying to get to know each other.

2. It’s complicated

Because of all that truth, Love doesn’t run smoothly. Will-they-won’t-they doesn’t really do justice to the convoluted course of the couple’s relationship. Rather than skimming over the kinks in a race to get the protagonists together, Love digs deeper into each crack and really explores it. The characters are three-dimensional, too. Gus isn’t just the lovable nerd who needs to cut loose, and Mickey is more than a wild child struggling with an over-reliance on booze and drugs.

3. It’s funny

If all that truth and complexity is starting to sound rather serious, don’t forget – this series is brought to you by the director of The 40-Year-Old Virgin, Knocked Up and Bridesmaids. Judd Apatow knows funny, and Love’s comic moments will take you from a wry chuckle to a belly laugh. Cameos and the supporting cast fuel the straight-up humorous moments, from Australian comedian Claudia O’Doherty as Mickey’s roommate to troubled American comic Andy Dick (seemingly playing himself).

4. It’s addictive

Mickey’s difficulties with addiction – and the refreshing nuance with which they’re presented – give the series an interesting second string. But beware, watching Love may fuel your own habit. The Netflix tactic of releasing each series as a whole makes it dangerously easy to watch episodes back to back until well past bedtime. Settle down, plunge in and get ready to fall right into Love.

Find Love with one click on Netflix on BT TV.