Patsy Palmer has said she would “never say never” about returning to the role of Bianca Jackson in EastEnders but thinks that modern spoilers ruin it for fans.

The actress departed the soap in 2014 after 20 years on and off in Walford, but Patsy said it would be foolish to rule out a comeback.

Patsy Palmer arriving for the 2014 National Television Awards at the O2 Arena, London.
Patsy Palmer (Dominic Lipinski/PA)

She moved with her family to Los Angeles after she left Albert Square but she said she has been excited by the return of her on-screen brother Robbie and sister Sonia, played by Dean Gaffney and Natalie Cassidy, to Albert Square.

Asked if she would go back to join them, she told ITV’s Loose Women: “I don’t know.

“To be honest I would never say never about anything, it’s a big mistake if you say things like that but I’m nearly 45.

Patsy Palmer arriving for the 2009 British Soap Awards at the BBC Television Centre, Wood Lane, London.
Patsy Palmer (Ian West/PA)

“There is so much you don’t do when you’re in Elstree for 20 years on and off.”

Patsy said the show was in its heyday before plotlines were leaked in advance, telling the programme: “It was really well written, I haven’t watched it, obviously, for ages, but it was really well written back then and we had two episodes a week, everybody wanted to know what was going on, there weren’t any spoilers.

“I always used to moan about this in work, saying: ‘Why do you keep telling everybody what’s going to happen? It’s supposed to be a soap opera, you’re supposed to have a cliffhanger. Why do you keep telling everybody what is going to happen?’”

Patsy because a household name when she starred on the show, and was best known for her habit of screaming “Rickaaaaaaaay” at her husband Ricky Butcher, played by Sid Owen.

Sid starred as Ricky opposite Patsy Palmer as Bianca (Phil Noble/PA)
Ricky and Bianca (Phil Noble/PA)

However, she said she does not think she was the one who originated the catchphrase, saying: “I don’t think I ever said that, that was only said by Jonathan Ross in that way and maybe it got played up more after that, they like to play up to that kind of thing.”

Asked if she enjoyed being associated with a catchphrase, she said: “It makes your life hell.

“Any poor kids that were ever called Ricky, their lives must have been hell, being shouted and screamed at in the street.”